Medieval cuisine

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Perhaps as a consequence of the Norman conquest and the travelling of nobles between France and England, one French variant described in the 14th century cookbook Le Menagier de Paris was called godale most likely a direct borrowing from the English "good ale" and was made from barley and spelt , but without hops. Even comparatively exotic products like camel 's milk and gazelle meat generally received more positive attention in medical texts. For most medieval Europeans, it was a humble brew compared with common southern drinks and cooking ingredients, such as wine, lemons and olive oil. A medieval cook employed in a large household would most likely have been able to plan and produce a meal without the help of recipes or written instruction. Gruit had the same preserving properties as hops, though less reliable depending on what herbs were in it, and the end result was much more variable. Even if vinegar was a common ingredient, there was only so much of it that could be used. Even there it was not until the 14th century that the fork became common among Italians of all social classes.


There are no serious side effects, only some reports of mild digestive issues (14). It is best to get a brand with at least 50 Hydroxycitric acid. The most common dosage is 500 mg, 3 times per day, half an hour before meals.